Posts Tagged ‘Policy’

Symposium on Frugal Innovations in Hamburg

Thursday, October 3rd, 2013

“Mastering the Frugal Challenge: Innovating for Global Growth through Affordable Solutions”

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Date: Tuesday, 19.11.2013, 9:00 – 18:00 hours
Location: Guest House of the University of Hamburg,
Rothenbaumchaussee 34, D-20148 Hamburg, German
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Organizer: Center for Frugal Innovation at TIM/TUHH
Cooperation partners: German-Indian Round Table (GIRT), European Institute for Technology and Innovation Management (EITIM)
Download: Information & preliminary agenda (PDF), Registration form (PDF)
Website: www.frugal-innovation.net
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Center for Frugal Innovation @ TIM/TUHH

The inaugural symposium on frugal innovations organized by the newly-launched Center for Frugal Innovation at the Institute for Technology and Innovation Management (TIM) of Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) intends to cover upcoming key questions on global growth in both emerging as well as developed markets through affordable and good-enough solutions.

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Is Japan a Lead Market for Age-Based Innovations?

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

要旨 | 申し込み | 場所 | 地図 | 研究プロ-ジェクト

2013年09月26日 | 6.30 P.M.

Cornelius Herstatt, Professor, Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH)

Many developed countries including Japan are undergoing comprehensive demographic change, marked by a growing share of elderly people. Product and service innovation can play a role in coping with the resulting societal challenges, especially when these help to support the preservation of elderly people’s personal autonomy. The range of these age-specific innovations is enormous and includes, for example, mobility aids and household devices but also special financial products.

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India orders ‘compulsory license’ for Bayer’s cancer drug

Tuesday, March 13th, 2012

According to one report in the Economic Times (13.03.2012):

The government has allowed a local drugmaker to make and sell a patented cancer drug at a fraction of the price charged by Germany’s Bayer AG, setting a precedent for more such efforts by Indian firms and heightening the global pharmaceutical industry’s anxiety over the use of the controversial compulsory licensing provision.

The outgoing patent controller of India, PH Kurian, on Monday granted the country’s first compulsory licence to Hyderabad-based Natco Pharma, permitting it to manufacture and market a generic version of Nexavar, a medicine used for treating liver and kidney cancer, in India for just 3% of the patented drug’s price in return for paying 6% royalty on sales to Bayer.

[…] Bayer is expected to legally challenge the decision. “We will evaluate our options to further defend our intellectual property rights in India,” a company spokesman said. […]

Source: “Natco Pharma bags licence to sell Bayer’s cancer drug Nexavar” (Economic Times, 13.03.2012)

Also see: “India patent ruling may open door for cheaper HIV drugs” (Economic Times, 13.03.2012)

Science and technology: falling patent quality hits innovation, says OECD

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

Source: OECD press release, dated 20.09.2011:

20/09/2011 – The quality of patent filings has fallen dramatically over the past two decades. The rush to protect even minor improvements in products or services is overburdening patent offices. This slows the time to market for true innovations and reduces the potential for breakthrough inventions, according to a new OECD report.

The Science, Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2011finds that patent quality has declined by an average of around 20 per cent between the 1990s and 2000s, a pattern seen in nearly all countries studied.Studying patent quality in different sectors has also allowed the OECD to assess which countries are doing best in innovation. The United Kingdom, for example, produces semiconductor and environmental technology patents that are above average in quality.

 

Korea has a competitive advantage in ICT-related innovations. And Germany is strong at innovating in solar energy.

Patents from inventors in the United States, Germany and Japan are the most highly cited, which suggests they are true innovations being used by many firms in their products to generate further innovations.

 

But while these countries produced about 70% of the top 1% of highly cited patents between 1996 and 2000,  their share had fallen to 60% five years later.

 

The Nordic countries and China, India and Korea have seen their share increase of highly cited patents. The European Union is leading in clean energy technologies, representing nearly 40% of all filings by the late 2000s, followed by the US and Japan. In this area, China now ranks 8th worldwide.

 

The OECD report ranks research by universities worldwide. Overall, 40 of the top 50 are located in the United States, with the rest in Europe. But a more diverse picture emerges when looking at subject areas. In social sciences, for example, the UK leads with 16 of the top 50 institutions after the US. And there is growing evidence that universities in Asia are emerging as leading research institutions: China has 6 in the top 50 in pharmacology, toxicology and pharmaceutics. And Hong Kong University is among the best in computer science, engineering and chemistry.

 

The US leads the world in research and development (R&D), with around USD 400 billion of spending on R&D in 2009. China is today second, with over one third of that total, followed by Japan. The European Union as a whole spent about USD 300 billion in 2009.

 

The Scoreboard tracks trends in science, technology and industry to understand how innovation is evolving and how countries are positioning themselves in the global knowledge economy. It includes more than 180 internationally comparable quality indicators and provides a broad range of statistics for other major economies such as Brazil, China, India, and the Russian Federation.

 

The complete Scoreboard 2011 is available at www.oecd.org/sti/scoreboard and provides easy access to individual sections and links to the databases used. Each indicator is also downloadable in PDF format.

 

For further information about this report, please contact Alessandra Colecchia (tel. + 33 1 45 24 94 12), OECD’s Science, Technology and Industry Directorate.

Infosys reportedly gave up China investment plans for IPR fears on clients’ side

Sunday, September 11th, 2011

According to a news item appearing the Economic Times (7th Sept. 2011) Indian IT major Infosys gave up its plans for increasing foreign direct investment (FDI) in China as its major customers in Europe and the USA had apprehessions about their data procession and/or software-related work being done in China owing to fears about the protection of intellectual property rights.

The report cites as source a US diplomatic cable which has been released by WikiLeaks. It also narrates an incidence, which N.R. Narayana Murthy, Co-founder of Infosys reportedly told US diplomats:

Murthy said he understood the misgivings of his clients and narrated his experience in China to show how rampant piracy was. Stepping out of his central Beijing hotel to go for a stroll with Peter Bonfield, then CEO of British Telecom, they encountered a sidewalk vendor selling pirated Microsoft and Windows products.

Bonfield jokingly asked the vendor if he had Finacle (an Infosys banking software product) and the vendor replied: “I can get it for you tomorrow.”

Murthy, was at the same time quite clear about China’s potential, its qualities, and HR problems that it faces, as is clear from the next section:

Murthy, however, was optimistic about the long-term potential of China. As per the cable, he stated: “There is nobody better than the Chinese at solving a problem once they are serious about it.” Murthy said it would take four to five years for the Chinese to overcome that reluctance.

There were other concerns for Infosys to expand in China. Murthy told the diplomats that though qualified graduates were available, those with sufficient English skills commanded a high premium. He said retention was more difficult in China than in India, as Chinese professionals are more willing to leave for a higher salary where Indian ones value institutions a bit more.

The whole report is available at: The Economic Times (11.09.2011)