Posts Tagged ‘Indian OFDI’

“Aiming Big with Small Cars”

Saturday, August 10th, 2013

A forthcoming publication on the emergence of a lead market for frugal products in India:

Aiming Big with Small Cars: Emergence of a Lead Market in India

By: Rajnish Tiwari and Cornelius Herstatt

India Studies in Business and EconomicsSpringer Verlag, Series: India Studies in Business and Economics

(2014, Approx. 180 p. 42 illus.)

Hardcover edition (ISBN 978-3-319-02065-5, Due: December 31, 2013)
E-book edition (to be available shortly, ISBN 978-3-319-02066-2)

About the book

  • Critical analysis of today’s dominant logic and extension of lead market paradigm
  • Delivers new assessment tools for identifying emerging lead markets
  • Explores opportunities for frugal innovations and their constituent characteristics
  • Detailed analysis of a sunrise industry in India​

New Publication: Open Global Innovation Networks as Enablers of Frugal Innovation

Thursday, January 3rd, 2013

New publication from Research Project Global Innovation of the Institute for Technology and Innovation Management, Hamburg University of Technology:

Open Global Innovation Networks as Enablers of Frugal Innovation: Propositions Based on Evidence from India

By: Rajnish Tiwari and Cornelius Herstatt

 

TIM/TUHH Working Paper No. 72

 

Summary

Recent years have seen the emergence of low-cost innovations targeted at economically weaker sections of the society, seeking to align business with social welfare. In many instances, results on the ground have been, however, rather sobering as firms have generally (probably justifiably) worried that “good quality, low price” products may cannibalize into their regular business. At the same time those very customers that were intended to benefit from the new approach have tended to shy away fearing low quality and social stigma of using cheap products. Using multiple case studies of successful affordability-driven innovations (“frugal innovations”) from India we investigate how firms can effectively reduce market and technology uncertainty of product innovations targeted at price-sensitive customers. The key criteria to success seem to lie in reducing the overall cost of ownership and enhancing customer perception of quality and image. The case studies reveal that affordability-driven innovations are especially successful when firms seek recourse to “open global innovation networks” (OGINs) for collaborative development in all phases of the innovation value chain.

Keywords:

Frugal Innovations, Bottom of the Pyramid, Lead Markets, Open Innovation, Global Innovation, India, Open Global Innovation Networks, Innovation Systems

Download Working Paper 72 (PDF, 526 KB)

 

Note: This working paper is an unedited, authors’ version of an academic paper that was published as “Frugal Innovation: A Global Networks’ Perspective” in Die Unternehmung, (Swiss Journal of Business Research and Practice), Vol. 66, Issue 03 (2012), pp. 245-274. For the final, edited & peer-reviewed copy please refer to the published article.

 

Frugal Innovations for the ‘Unserved’ Customer: An Assessment of India’s Attractiveness as a Lead Market for Cost-effective Products

Thursday, March 1st, 2012

New publication from the Institute for Technology and Innovation Management, Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH)

Title: Frugal Innovations for the ‘Unserved’ Customer: An Assessment of India’s Attractiveness as a Lead Market for Cost-effective Products
Authored by: Rajnish Tiwari and Cornelius Herstatt
Publication date: March 2012
Download: http://www.global-innovation.net/publications/PDF/Working_Paper_69.pdf

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Abstract

This study builds on our previous work, which had questioned the validity of certain assumptions of the lead market theory in the face of changing ground realities in a globalized world. Sustained economic growth and proven technological capabilities in some “emerging economies” like China and India call for a reassessment of the appropriateness of the “conventional wisdom” that had held true until recently. While our previous study had “re-built” a theoretical background of the lead market model by introducing some new elements, and doing away with certain others, with the help of two in-depth case studies; the purpose of the present study is to specifically assess India’s potential as a lead market for cost-effective frugal innovations.

The study crystallizes the inherent characteristics of frugal innovations, their development process and market success in the domestic and overseas markets by analyzing four successful product innovations from selected industries in India. The factors identified thus are then incorporated in the theoretic model to derive propositions about India’s lead market potential. Whereas affordability and economies of scale have traditionally constituted the primary concern for frugal innovations, an increasing shift towards “value proposition” is identified. Intensifying competition and growing customer aspirations are changing the nature of frugal innovations. The hitherto unserved customer demands attractive designs and modern technologies to come out of his shell of “non-consumption”. Our research confirms that frugal innovations can benefit end-consumers and firms, simultaneously. Better-designed products also have positive impact on the lead market potential, creating a virtuous cycle. The study also discovered that the increasing need for sophistication coupled with continued cost pressures is shifting the product development processes into the domain of “open global innovation”, which also helps reduce the negative country-of-origin effects faced by developing countries. The research would have implications for location decisions in setting up global innovation/R&D activities.

Keywords: Lead Markets; Frugal Innovations; India; Bottom of the Pyramid; Global Innovation; Open Innovation; Emerging Economies.

The Hindu Business Line recommends reading Rajnish Tiwari’s article on Indian investments in Germany

Monday, February 13th, 2012

In an article titled “The horizon vocabulary” journalist D. Murali of The Hindu Business Line, a renowned newspaper from India, recommends reading an article (“Investment Destination Germany: Chances & Challenges for Indian Firms“) written by Rajnish Tiwari, Head of German-Indian Round Table in Hamburg:

Investment opportunities in Germany

In a significant contrast to their Chinese counterparts, Indian firms have so far tended to prefer developed Western countries for their investments, notes Rajnish Tiwari, Head of the German-Indian Round Table (GIRT) in Hamburg. Germany, along with the US and the UK, has emerged as a primary target for Indian FDI, he adds, in Investment destination Germany: Chances & challenges for Indian firms (www.ssrn.com). “With its established technological prowess, high-quality infrastructure and reliable institutional set-up, Germany is regarded as an excellent investment target by many Indian firms in their pursuit of newest technologies and commercially viable cutting-edge innovations,” Tiwari reasons.

The paper concedes that, since many Indian companies prefer to channelise their FDI projects to Germany through their existing domestic subsidiaries or through their daughter concerns in other European countries, the official data fail to capture the true extent of Indian engagement in Germany.

Tiwari urges Indian firms, therefore, to take advantage of Germany’s excellent physical infrastructure and technological know-how, including in the eastern part, while combining it with their own strengths in production, marketing, low-cost engineering, and business model innovations. Provides pointers that you may like to explore in detail.

Source: The Hindu Business Line, 11.02.2012

Direct link to the paper in question:
http://www.global-innovation.net/team/tiwari/PDF/Tiwari_BusinessGuide_2011.pdf

Book Review: The Rise of Indian Multinationals: Perspective of Indian Outward Foreign Direct Investment

Monday, February 13th, 2012

In its publication “Reserve Bank of India Occasional Papers” (Vol. 32. No. 1, Summer 2011) India’s central bank has published a review of the book “The Rise of Indian multinationals: Perspective of Indian Outward Foreign Direct Investment”, edited by Karl P. Sauvant and Jaya Prakash Pradhan with Ayesha Chatterjee and Brian Harley (Palgrave MacMillan: New York), 2010; pp 284, £90.

The review also includes a chapter on Indian investments in Germany. The reviewer Arvind K. Jha (Assistant Adviser, Department of Economic and Policy Research, Reserve Bank of India, Mumbai) writes:

“Chapter 8 on ‘The Emergence of Indian Multinationals: An Empirical Study of Motives, Current Status, and Trends of Indian Investment in Germany’, by Rajnish Tiwari and Cornelius Herstatt, presents the results of a empirical survey conducted among Indian subsidiaries operating in Germany. Survey brings out the fact that the majority of Indian companies investing in Germany are from service sectors like software and IT industry (more than half of Indian companies), pharmaceuticals and the automotive industry. Important factors behind the Indian OFDI to Germany are long tradition of economic relations between these two countries, proximity to their customers and suppliers, large access to German market and availability of skilled labour. Another interesting finding of this survey study is that Indian MNEs are net job creators in the Germany. The study also finds that Indian subsidiaries have generally performed well and look forward to strengthen their operational presence in Germany, including research and development activities. However, the survey also highlights the challenges, including cross-cultural issues, being faced by Indian MNEs in Germany.”

Source: Reserve Bank of India
http://www.rbi.org.in/scripts/bs_viewcontent.aspx?Id=2490