Posts Tagged ‘India’

“Mastering the Frugal Challenge”: A Symposium on the Feasibility of Frugal Innovations

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

We at the Center for Frugal Innovation are planning a symposium on the feasibility and implementation of frugal innovations in firms. The symposium with the title “Mastering the Frugal Challenge: Innovating for Global Growth through Affordable Solutions” will take place on 19th November 2013 in Hamburg. A detailed programme agenda and the registration modalities will be released soon at this space. The symposium will be preceded by a research seminar with invited guests from universities and research institutions on the 18th November in Hamburg.

In the meantime for any enquiry please contact: frugal.innovation@tuhh.de, and/or our team.

Telephone contact: Dr. Rajnish Tiwari (+49 40 42878 3776)

“Aiming Big with Small Cars”

Saturday, August 10th, 2013

A forthcoming publication on the emergence of a lead market for frugal products in India:

Aiming Big with Small Cars: Emergence of a Lead Market in India

By: Rajnish Tiwari and Cornelius Herstatt

India Studies in Business and EconomicsSpringer Verlag, Series: India Studies in Business and Economics

(2014, Approx. 180 p. 42 illus.)

Hardcover edition (ISBN 978-3-319-02065-5, Due: December 31, 2013)
E-book edition (to be available shortly, ISBN 978-3-319-02066-2)

About the book

  • Critical analysis of today’s dominant logic and extension of lead market paradigm
  • Delivers new assessment tools for identifying emerging lead markets
  • Explores opportunities for frugal innovations and their constituent characteristics
  • Detailed analysis of a sunrise industry in India​

New Publication: Lessons from low-cost healthcare innovations for the Base-of the Pyramid markets

Saturday, June 22nd, 2013

A new publication by Aditi Ramdorai and Cornelius Herstatt of Research Project Global Innovation at TIM/TUHH looks at “Lessons from low-cost healthcare innovations for the Base-of the Pyramid markets: How incumbents can systematically create disruptive innovations”

(Working Paper No. 74, Institute for Technology and Innovation Management, Hamburg University of Technology, June 2013, PDF, 216 KB)

Abstract

Frugal innovations, characterized by their focus on affordability and retaining key functionalities of products/services, are emerging in the healthcare sector from India – ranging from low-cost healthcare delivery by hospitals like Aravind Eye Care that provides cataract surgery to around 300,000 patients at a cost of 18 USD per patient to product innovations such as the Jaipur Foot, a low-cost prosthesis. These frugal innovations represent disruptive innovations, innovations that are typically simpler, more convenient and more affordable. Disruptive innovations create growth potential for companies while opening up access to products and services that were previously beyond peoples’ reach. Low-income markets or Base-of-the-Pyramid [BOP] markets present new opportunities to Multi-National Corporations [MNCs] and scholars are calling MNCs to leverage BOP markets to create disruptive innovations.

Established incumbents generally fail to successfully commercialize disruptive innovations. Their internal processes and values force them to focus on their existing customers, thereby ignoring projects targeted at new emerging markets that lack a customer base.

An exception to this is the American incumbent GE Healthcare, which has been creating several low-cost innovations targeted at emerging markets for the past years. In this research, we look at organizational structures and processes that GE Healthcare has in place, which enables it to create disruptive innovations systematically. With this we hope to contribute towards building disruptive innovation theory, where questions pertaining to selective success and failure of incumbents to create disruptive innovations remain unanswered. Literature on disruptive innovations recommends incumbent firms to create a separate entity for commercializing disruptive innovations. However, scholars have been calling upon firms to explore new markets and exploit existing opportunities simultaneously.

The ability to successfully drive disruptive innovations from within the organization will be analyzed through the lens of organizational ambidexterity. Ambidexterity is the ability of organizations to successfully balance exploration and exploitation. The manifestation of this act of balancing exploitation and exploration is the companies’ ability to initiate multiple innovation streams, in this case sustaining innovations and disruptive. Key proponents of organizational ambidexterity, O’Reilly and Tushman, consider it a “solution to the innovator’s dilemma”, however present their thesis only conceptually. This work will look at the mechanisms of ambidexterity at GE Healthcare to help explain its ability in successfully hosting sustaining and disruptive innovations from within its boundaries.

New Publication: Open Global Innovation Networks as Enablers of Frugal Innovation

Thursday, January 3rd, 2013

New publication from Research Project Global Innovation of the Institute for Technology and Innovation Management, Hamburg University of Technology:

Open Global Innovation Networks as Enablers of Frugal Innovation: Propositions Based on Evidence from India

By: Rajnish Tiwari and Cornelius Herstatt

 

TIM/TUHH Working Paper No. 72

 

Summary

Recent years have seen the emergence of low-cost innovations targeted at economically weaker sections of the society, seeking to align business with social welfare. In many instances, results on the ground have been, however, rather sobering as firms have generally (probably justifiably) worried that “good quality, low price” products may cannibalize into their regular business. At the same time those very customers that were intended to benefit from the new approach have tended to shy away fearing low quality and social stigma of using cheap products. Using multiple case studies of successful affordability-driven innovations (“frugal innovations”) from India we investigate how firms can effectively reduce market and technology uncertainty of product innovations targeted at price-sensitive customers. The key criteria to success seem to lie in reducing the overall cost of ownership and enhancing customer perception of quality and image. The case studies reveal that affordability-driven innovations are especially successful when firms seek recourse to “open global innovation networks” (OGINs) for collaborative development in all phases of the innovation value chain.

Keywords:

Frugal Innovations, Bottom of the Pyramid, Lead Markets, Open Innovation, Global Innovation, India, Open Global Innovation Networks, Innovation Systems

Download Working Paper 72 (PDF, 526 KB)

 

Note: This working paper is an unedited, authors’ version of an academic paper that was published as “Frugal Innovation: A Global Networks’ Perspective” in Die Unternehmung, (Swiss Journal of Business Research and Practice), Vol. 66, Issue 03 (2012), pp. 245-274. For the final, edited & peer-reviewed copy please refer to the published article.

 

Innovation strategies of selected German multinationals in India

Thursday, September 13th, 2012

Recently, René Neukirchner, student at TUHH carried out a study of “Innovation strategies of selected German multinationals in India” under the aegis of Research Project Global Innovation. The study carried out under supervision of Rajnish Tiwari was presented at the September meeting of German-Indian Round Table in Hamburg:

“On this occasion Mr. René Neukirchner, student at Hamburg University of Technology, will present results of a study of innovation strategies pursued by some of the largest German companies in India, which include BASF, Bosch, Daimler, SAP and Siemens. The study looks at a unique combination of “global innovation” with “open innovation”. It examines which projects are being pursued by those firms and to what extent they are engaged in research collaboration with local Indian partners. The underlying idea is to learn from such strategies and to reduce market risk and technology uncertainty.”

Those interested may download the study results as PDF, approx. 2 MB.