Posts Tagged ‘Brazil’

New paper: “Global Innovation Strategies of German Hidden Champions in Key Emerging Markets”

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

Working_Paper_85A new paper by Stephan Buse and Rajnish Tiwari of the Center for Frugal Innovation at the Hamburg University of Technology that examines product and market cultivation strategies employed by German mid-sized firms (“Mittelstand”) in the BRIC nations, especially China and India. The paper was preseneted at the XXV ISPIM Conference – Innovation for Sustainable Economy & Society, Dublin, Ireland on 8-11 June 2014.

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Symposium on Frugal Innovations in Hamburg

Thursday, October 3rd, 2013

“Mastering the Frugal Challenge: Innovating for Global Growth through Affordable Solutions”

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Date: Tuesday, 19.11.2013, 9:00 – 18:00 hours
Location: Guest House of the University of Hamburg,
Rothenbaumchaussee 34, D-20148 Hamburg, German
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Organizer: Center for Frugal Innovation at TIM/TUHH
Cooperation partners: German-Indian Round Table (GIRT), European Institute for Technology and Innovation Management (EITIM)
Download: Information & preliminary agenda (PDF), Registration form (PDF)
Website: www.frugal-innovation.net
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Center for Frugal Innovation @ TIM/TUHH

The inaugural symposium on frugal innovations organized by the newly-launched Center for Frugal Innovation at the Institute for Technology and Innovation Management (TIM) of Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) intends to cover upcoming key questions on global growth in both emerging as well as developed markets through affordable and good-enough solutions.

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“Aiming Big with Small Cars”

Saturday, August 10th, 2013

A forthcoming publication on the emergence of a lead market for frugal products in India:

Aiming Big with Small Cars: Emergence of a Lead Market in India

By: Rajnish Tiwari and Cornelius Herstatt

India Studies in Business and EconomicsSpringer Verlag, Series: India Studies in Business and Economics

(2014, Approx. 180 p. 42 illus.)

Hardcover edition (ISBN 978-3-319-02065-5, Due: December 31, 2013)
E-book edition (to be available shortly, ISBN 978-3-319-02066-2)

About the book

  • Critical analysis of today’s dominant logic and extension of lead market paradigm
  • Delivers new assessment tools for identifying emerging lead markets
  • Explores opportunities for frugal innovations and their constituent characteristics
  • Detailed analysis of a sunrise industry in India​

“Emerging world on science fast-track”

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

“The global balance of science is shifting fast, as research powerhouses emerge in the developing world to challenge the traditional scientific leaders in North America, Europe and Japan”, reports a news item in the Financial Times, published 28th of March 2011.

According to the article, “[a]lthough the scientific rise of China, India and Brazil has been well-documented, a new study by the Royal Society, Britain’s national academy of science, identifies other ‘rapidly emerging scientific nations not traditionally associated with a strong science base’. ” The study identifies several of the “newcomers” as coming from “the Islamic world”.

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To read further go to the Financial Times (FT) site

Note: Access to FT articles might be restricted

Benevolent Benefactor or Insensitive Regulator? Tracing the Role of Government Policies in the Development of India’s Automobile Industry

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011

New publication

by Rajnish Tiwari, Cornelius Herstatt, and Mahipat Ranawat

Policy Studies, No. 58

Publisher: Honolulu: East-West Center
Publication Date: 2011
ISBN: 978-1-932728-90-3
Binding: paper
Pages: xiv, 64
Price: $10.00

Free Download: PDF

Abstract

The impressive and sustained growth of India’s automobile industry in recent years has catapulted it into the league of the world’s top-seven producers of four-wheelers. In the past decade, its exports have surged more than 25 percent a year on average. The turning point was arguably the 1991 policy of economic liberalization, but the impact of the reforms might have been subdued, if the Government of India had not played a pivotal role in the industry’s evolution. This apparent “paradox” may be the key to understanding why the industry has adjusted so quickly to globalization, even though economic reforms began relatively late.

This study identifies the main thrusts of policy regimes for the automobile sector since 1947, which began in an overregulation mode in the early period of independence. Nonetheless, the government consciously attempted to create and sustain favorable “innovation systems” at national, regional, and sectoral levels. Especially since 1991, many policy initiatives have benefited the industry and helped it reach the growth path it is following today.

URL: http://www.EastWestCenter.org/pubs/3768